Page 7 - 2007_2008_Annual_Report

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M E S S A G E F R O M T H E C H A I R P E R S O N
It’s a privilege and an honour to chair the Saskatchewan Indian
Gaming Authority Board of Directors. Through the delivery of
an excellent entertainment product, comfortable and attractive
facilities and over 1,700 dedicated employees, the company
continues to play a vital role in providing positive financial
returns for First Nations people and the people of Saskatchewan.
In 2007/08, a strong focus was placed on developing our people
resources, expansion into a new market and reinvesting in our
facilities. In fact, others took note and SIGA was honoured with
the 2007 Business of the Year by both SaskBusiness Magazine
and Tourism Saskatchewan. We are truly proud of this accomplishment for our management and
staff at our five First Nations casinos in Saskatchewan.
Further, SIGA received national recognition for governance excellence this year, placing in the
top three nationally at the Conference Board of Canada’s Governance of Excellence awards
in the non-profit sector. SIGA was noteworthy not only for policies and procedures that are
consistent with best business and governance practices in Canada, but also for aligning
these best practices with our five guiding principles and retaining our culture and identity
as a First Nations organization.
I am encouraged by the organization’s strategic and business plans, placing an emphasis on
reinvestment, new opportunities through new gaming and expanded entertainment products.
As stewards of the organization, we, the Board, are committed to using our experiences,
skills and talents to assist the management team and the rest of the company to build on
the remarkable successes and achievements of 2007/08.
Ray Ahenakew
SIGA Board Chair
2 0 0 8 C o n f e r e n c e B o a r d o f C a n a d a / S p e n c e r S t u a r t N a t i o n a l
SIGA was recognized by the Conference Board of Canada: Top 3 for Non-Profit sector.
“ SIGA has developed a governance framework with policies and procedures that
are consistent with best business and governance practices in Canada. However,
more importantly, they also align with the organization’s five guiding principles,
allowing it to retain its identity and culture as a First Nations business.”